pan out

verb
1. be a success
-

The idea panned out

Verb Frames:
-

Something ——s

2. wash dirt in a pan to separate out the precious minerals
Syn: ↑pan, ↑pan off
Derivationally related forms: ↑pan (for: ↑pan)
Hypernyms: ↑wash
Verb Frames:
-

Somebody ——s something

* * *

1 Harold's idea hadn't panned out: SUCCEED, be successful, work (out), turn out well.
2 the deal panned out badly: TURN OUT, work out, end (up), come out, fall out, evolve; formal eventuate.
pan

* * *

intransitive verb
Etymology: pan (II)
: to yield a result : turn out

if things pan out as he expects

considered a genius if his experiments panned out

* * *

ˌpan ˈout [intransitive] [present tense I/you/we/they pan out he/she/it pans out present participle panning out past tense panned out past participle panned out] informal phrasal verb
if a situation pans out in a particular way, it develops in that way

Let’s see how things pan out before we decide.

Thesaurus: to happen in a particular waysynonym
Main entry: pan

* * *

(of gravel) yield gold
turn out well

Harold's idea had been a good one even if it hadn't panned out

he's happy with the way the deal panned out

* * *

pan out [phrasal verb]
1 : to develop or happen

We'll have to see how things pan out. [=turn out]

2 : to have the end or result that you want : to succeed or turn out well

If things don't pan out [=work out] here, I'll move back to the city.

Her plans never panned out.

He applied for a number of jobs and is hoping that one of them will pan out. [=hoping that he will get one of the jobs]

• • •
Main Entry:pan

* * *

ˌpan ˈout derived
(informal) (of events or a situation) to develop in a particular way

I'm happy with the way things have panned out.

Main entry:panderived

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pan out — {v.}, {informal} To have a result, especially a good result; result favorably; succeed. * /Suppose the class tried to make money by selling candy. How would that pan out?/ * /Edison s efforts to invent an electric light bulb did not pan out until …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pan out — {v.}, {informal} To have a result, especially a good result; result favorably; succeed. * /Suppose the class tried to make money by selling candy. How would that pan out?/ * /Edison s efforts to invent an electric light bulb did not pan out until …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pan out — (p[a^]n out ), 1. v. i. To succeed; as, the project didn t pan out. [PJC] 2. To turn out (profitably or unprofitably); to result; to develop; as, the investigation, or the speculation, panned out poorly. [Slang, U. S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pan out — [v] come to pass; succeed click*, come out*, culminate, eventuate, go, go over*, happen, net*, prove out, result, turn out, work out, yield; concept 706 Ant. fail, not happen  …   New thesaurus

  • pan out — phrasal verb [intransitive] Word forms pan out : present tense I/you/we/they pan out he/she/it pans out present participle panning out past tense panned out past participle panned out informal if a situation pans out in a particular way, it… …   English dictionary

  • pan out — in. [for something] to work out or turn out all right. □ Don’t worry. Everything will pan out okay. □ Nothing seems to pan out for me anymore …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • pan\ out — v informal To have a result, especially a good result; result favorably; succeed. Suppose the class tried to make money by selling candy. How would that pan out? Edison s efforts to invent an electric light bulb did not pan out until he used… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • pan out — succeed, go as planned, work out    Blair s ideas usually pan out. His suggestions are practical …   English idioms

  • pan out — end or finish favorably, work out well I hope that your plans to go back to school pan out well …   Idioms and examples

  • pan out — verb a) To separate and recover (valuable minerals) by swirling dirt or crushed rock in a pan of water, in the manner of a traditional prospector seeking gold. On the Saturday holidays in summer time we used to borrow skiffs whose owners were not …   Wiktionary

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